World of Jazz Podcast #20 – 21st March 2013

This podcast is a music only mix which is available from www.mixcloud.com/BobonSCR/world-of-jazz-podcast-20/

DAVE DOUGLAS

“Time Travel” by Dave Douglas Quintet is the all-instrumental follow-up to “Be Still” featuring the same players and vocalist Aoife O’Donovan. Even with the identical personnel (sans O’Donovan) “Time Travel” is it’s own statement. “I was really interested in what David Toomey wrote in his book The New Time Travelers,” Douglas says. “How the concept of time travel has been around a long time, and how it is evident in the way we think and the way we create: backwards, forwards, all directions at once, beyond the speed of light, rearranging our understanding of cause and effect.”

releases 09 April 2013 

Dave Douglas – trumpet
Jon Irabagon – saxophone
Matt Mitchell – piano
Linda Oh – bass
Rudy Royston – drums
Link : http://music.davedouglas.com/
  • Featured Track : Garden State

JOE HARRIOT

During the late 1960s Harriott and violinist John Mayer developed Indo-Jazz Fusion – an early attempt at building on music from diverse traditions. This involved a “double quintet” of five Indian and five jazz musicians playing together on a number of compositions largely conceived by Mayer. Opinion is often divided on the validity of these experiments. Whilst they offered a new and unique fusion of styles, it could be that the composition structures did not allow the freedom of the jazzmen to improvise. Three albums resulted from the collaboration with Mayer: Indo Jazz Suite (Atlantic 1966)- which is featured hear  Indo Jazz Fusions Volume 1 and 2 (Columbia (UK) 1967 and 1968).
  • Featured Track : Raga Megha

MILES TRIBUTES

This section of the podcast looks at various tributes to Miles Davis…..

RON CARTER

Although he has been involved  in a couple of Miles Davis tribute bands and Herbie Hancock’s V.S.O.P. up until the Dear Miles album Carter resisted the urge to create an album featuring the legacy of his ex-boss. Only seven of the ten songs on the album are associated with Davis and “Bags’ Groove” is a bit of a stretch. Also there is no trumpet played on the album allowing for a different angle on the tribute.
Ron Carter – Bass
Stephen Scott – Piano
Payton Crossley – Drums
Roger Squitero  – Percussion
  • Featured Tracks : Stella By Starlight

WADADA LEO SMITH & HENRY KAISER

Yo Miles (1998) was the brainchild of experimental guitar hero Henry Kaiser and trumpet player Wadada Leo Smith, who teamed up with bassist Michael Manring, drummer Lukas Ligeti, and a group of other musicians including John Medeski, and Elliott Sharp  to rework some Miles Davis compositions from his electric jazz-funk period.  The sole non Miles tune on the album is featured – a Smith composition.
  • Featured Track : Miles Dewey Davis III Great Ancestor

MARCUS MILLER

Miller delivered a double live album of the work which launched Miles on Warners – Tutu Revisited (2011). Recorded live at Lyon Auditorium on December 22, 2009  there is a complimentary DVD of the proceedings.
Marcus Miller – Bass, Bass Clarinet
Ronald Bruner, Jr. – Drums
Federico Gonzalez Peña – Keyboards
Alex Han – Saxophone
Christian Scott  – Trumpet
  • Featured Track – Tutu

 MILT JACKSON

 Jackson’s Ville is one of four Savoy CDs that pair Jackson with Lucky Thompson.  Bluesy hard bop from 1956.
Milt Jackson – Vibes
Lucky Thompson – Tenor Saxophone
Hank Jones – Piano
Wendell Marshall – Bass
Kenny Clarke – Drums
  • Featured Track – Soul in 3-4

ART FARMER

Art Farmer had switched to the flumpet (a customized hybrid of the fluegelhorn and the trumpet created especially for him) by the time of this 1991 concert, which was recorded at the Blue Note in Fukuoda, Japan.  A great interpretation of Ellington and Strayhorn’s classic track.
Art Farmer – Flumpet
Geoff Keezer – Piano
Kenny Davis – Bass
Lewis Nash – Drums
  • Featured Track : Ishfahan

JOE FARRELL

Joe Farrell, known in the ’60s as a hard bop tenor saxophonist, moved into new areas  in the 1970s. On this near-classic album from 1970 The Joe Farrell Quartet  Farrell switches between tenor, soprano, flute, and  oboe while being joined by a rather notable band of the four jazz stars who made up Miles Davis’ Lost Quintet in 1969. Which implies that the album should be entitled quintet rather than quartet?
Joe Farrell – Saxophones, Flute, Oboe
John McLaughlin – Guitar
Chick Corea – Piano
Dave Holland – Bass
Jack DeJohnette – Drums
  • Featured track : Alter Ego

cover

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