Fascinating Things : Issue 25

There is a new single out from the excellent Damn Vandals which is released on 6th November.

The new album from Myrkur is absolutely stunning, the blend of ethereal ambience and throat shredding death metal is quite remarkable,

 

Melbourne based band The Sunday Reeds are Romana Ashton (vocals, bass) and Drew Jones (guitars). Their debut LP ‘Drowning in History, released through UK indie label Squirrel Records in 2009, led to an extensive European tour in 2010 which won the band a huge following but came at a cost. Then a couple, Romana and Drew split up in Paris, the City of Love, an experience that became the inspiration for their critically acclaimed EP ‘Amour Tragique’, a collection of five songs about love and loss. Latest single ‘Pretty People’ written by Romana Ashton, produced by the band and mixed by James Aparicio (Spiritualized and Mute Records) offers an insight into the direction of the album that the duo are currently writing. On one level ‘Pretty People’ is about cliques and their sense of self-importance, and on another, is a caustic social commentary about our culture’s fascination with ‘the trivial’, celebrity, gossip and fame by proxy. A video for the single will be released on the 12th of October to coincide with the official release of the track to the public. The Sunday Reeds plan to tour Europe in 2016.

PromoImage

Kranky have announced the upcoming Christopher Bissonnette album, Pitch, Paper & Foil, which is to be released on the 6th November. Continuing the explorations of the analog synthesizer first revealed on his last album, Bissonnette’s deft touch in recording and mixing is a joy to experience. While most contemporary analog synth dabblers find themselves unable to not overload the sound-field with the endless array of possibilities the instrument provides, Bissonnette provides a master class in economy and control.

 

 

Advertisements

Idle Essays

Christopher Bissonnette

Essays In Idleness

Kranky

Release: 7 April 2014KRANK187_5x5_300dpi

“Essays in Idleness was born from a desire for a more tactile approach to sound generation. With a limited number of sound sources, the process encouraged more focused examination of the available range of choices.

The album is a series of experiments subsequent to a period of deep reflection on my working process. This sequence of tracks is the culmination of two years of intense exploration with the intention of allowing the medium to have a more profound affect on the outcome, the methodology allowing chance, risk and error to play a greater role.
 Some of the studies focus on a generative process, allowing the composition to build upon itself, while others are constructed from more complex textures and compositional fragments that shift and modulate organically.” – Christopher Bissonnette 

The third album from Canadian composer Christopher Bissonnette sees him expanding his palette by narrowing his sound sources to a self built analog synthesiser. Eschewing the whiplash and/or everything including the kitchen sink style of assembly so common among current analog aficionados, Bissonnette instead applies his signature compositional style of using long held tones and sweeping drones that alternate between, and fuse, pure tonal transcendence and patient, sparkling melodies that slowly reveal themselves.

The Aural Delights View : The discipline used here is fascinating – the use of the patches from one machine, rather than limiting the scope of the music, actually frees the player to explore the minute interactions between the sounds. Lovers of this form ambient sound scape will recognise the usual motifs of the genre – Bissonnette’s use of long sweeps with varying textures, together with the occasional “noise”/glitch/bell patch to break up the contemplative nature of the music creates an interesting dynamic.  Whilst there is nothing particularly different from other proponents of this area of electronic music the attention to detail, the variety,  and the overall mood of the pieces makes for a very enjoyable listen.