World of Jazz – 24th May 2012

On this weeks show -listen in here

1 Carsten Dahl Experience Turkis Butterfly Metamorphosis
2 Dexter Gordon Soul Sister Dexter Calling
3 Hampton Hawes St Thomas The Green Leaves Of Summer
4 Indigo Jam Unit with Alicia Saldenha Funkier than a mosquito’s tweeter Rose
5 Komeda Quartet Kattorna Astigmatic
6 Max Roach Jodies Cha Cha Deeds No Words
7 Nancy Wilson (They Call It) Stormy Monday Something Wonderful
8 Ron Carter Rally Where?
9 Roy Hargrove presents the RH Factor Liquid Streets Hard Groove
10 John Coltrane Time After Time Stardust
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World of Jazz Radio Show – 3rd May 2012

Old and new with more vocals than usual – listen here

1 George Braith Nut City Extension
2 Andrew Hill Plantation Rag Passing Ships
3 Harold Land Angel Dance The Peacemaker
4 Abbey Lincoln Blue Monk Straight Ahead
5 Charlie Parker Sippin’ At Bells Complete Savoy and Dial Sessions
6 Dexter Gordon Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool Getting’ Around
7 Roy Ayers Mine Royd Virgo Vibes
8 Massimo Biolcalti Winterhouse Persona
9 Hank Jones Love Come Take Me Again Here’s Love
10 Gregory Porter Painted Canvas Be Good
11 Billie Holiday Strange Fruit with Tony Scott Orchestra

Music Diary #19 – 19th January 2012 & World of Jazz

A new AAAK EP on its way to us shortly – love the moody cover of Paul and Ding and looking forward to hearing the Violent Snog mix of I assume “Sweet Sweet Kiss” – difficult to see as the reflected flash is in the way…..

Those merry funsters Well Wisher  have a new EP out on 25th January 2012 called “Summer Gangs”  – you can stream it on Bandcamp at this moment in time. As usually their breathtaking post-hardcore slacker indie punky pop is a refreshing antidote to the tired playlists wombled out by the so-called “taste-makers” out there. Highly recommended.

Pleased to see 50FOOTWAVE have released a new EP which is called “With Love From The Men’s Room” and it’s free from here – as usual K Hersh is on fine form and it is to be hoped they can make it over to the UK for some gigs in the near future.

Mr MJ Leigh has made four more Kill Pretty tracks available for download  here – suffice to to say they are all rather marvellous…..really looking forward to next weeks gig at the Kings Arms. The lyrics on some of these are NSFW.

And so to this weeks World of Jazz at the hail stones thunder down outside the Half Edge Recording Studios……..

I felt in a fusion-y sort of mood this week so I opted for some Weather Report  to kick of the show. Featuring a track from the eponymous album which saw the last time Pastorius, Erskine, and Thomas Jr would play together as a rhythm section – some would argue they rather lost the plot after this album – not sure I agree there are some highlights in the later work.  I’ve recently been introduced to the work of Dag Arnesen and I was drawn to the album featured on this show through the presence of Palle Mikkelborg on trumpet. Beautiful melodies and great playing.

Always pleased to feature the great James Spaulding on the show and the bluesy cut played on this show demonstrates his ability to adapt. Australian Mike Nock has been around for a while and he always delivers great albums – never gets the attention he deserves I reckon. Marcus Millers re-invention of Miles Davis’s first Warners album “Tutu” is interesting – whilst it’s appreciate he contributed considerably to the original one wonders why he felt it necessary to put together this mammoth slab of work around it. I’m sort of conflicted on the need for it but it’s always good to hear George Duke’s wonderful “Backyard Ritual” and Christian Scott does well fitting into MDD’s shoes.

Sonny Criss working with Horace Tapscott has to be a bonus and the nonet cut from the “Sonny’s Dream” album is rather groovy. Following that with some Stan Getz from an album produced in collaboration with (Big A&M)* Herb Alpert towards the end of the great mans career. Concluding with some ECM ambience from Don Cherry and friends, a great ballad from Dexter Gordon and a mood piece from Manchester based jazzer Matthew Halsall.

(* Gratuitous Fall Fan Reference c.f.  CnC-S Mithering from Grotesque After the Gramme)

Enjoy here.…..

1 Weather Report Volcano for Hire Weather Report
2 Dag Arnesen Astrid Mi Astrid Norwegian Songs 3
3 James Spaulding Gerkin for Perkins Blues Nexus
4 Mike Nock Symbiosis Almanac
5 Marcus Miller Backyard Ritual Tutu Live
6 Sonny Criss The Golden Pearl Sonny’s Dream (The Birth of the New Cool)
7 Stan Getz Amorous Cat Apasionado
8 Don Cherry, Lennart Aberg, Bobo Stenson Prayer Dona Nostra
9 Dexter Gordon I guess I’ll hang my tears out to dry Ballads
10 Matthew Halsall The Journey Home On the go

World of Jazz Radio Show -20th October 2011

On this show… kicking off with a bit of a Cedar Walton theme and then some sort of continuity in terms of musicians across a number of the tracks:

  • Freddie Hubbard – Body and Soul – Here to Stay – released in 1979 as part of United Artists’ Blue Note reissue series,  with previously unreleased material from an all-star quintet including  Wayne Shorter (on tenor), Cedar Walton on piano , bassist Reggie Workman, and drummer Philly Joe Jones. An excellent hard bop set including this great version of “Body and Soul.”
  • Cedar Walton – Ojos De Rojo – Eastern Rebellion 2 – from the 1977 release from this collective of which Cedar Walton is the nominal leader.
  • Clifford Jordan – Blues for Muse – The Highest Mountain – Tenor-saxophonist Clifford Jordan teams up with pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Billy Higgins for this excellent modern hard bop set
  • Billy Higgins – East Side Stomp – Mr. Billy Higgins – and to keep the continuity going here is 1984 album with Billy mostly playing a supportive role , backing saxophonist Gary Bias , pianist William Henderson, and bassist Tony Dumas. with some  modal post-bop.
  • Gregory Porter – 1960 What? -Water – released last year and the stand out track from an album where he was described as the next big thing in the jazz male vocal world – not so sure about that statement but this is a great tune.
  • Dexter Gordon – Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool – Gettin’ Around – from 1965 and Dexter teaming up with vibist Bobby Hutcherson, Barry Harris, Bob Cranshaw and Billy Higgins  to create a bautiful post-bop album with some brilliant interplay between the two lead instruments.
  • Bobby Hutcherson – Maiden Voyage – Happenings –  Bobby’s first quartet recording highlights his soloing abilities, matching him with pianist Herbie Hancock   drummer Joe Chambers, and  bassist Bob Cranshaw.
  • Red Garland Quintet – Solitude- High Pressure – a classic 1957 date with   pianist Red Garland, tenor saxophonist John Coltrane   trumpeter Donald Byrd, along with bassist George Joyner and drummer Art Taylor.
You can hear the show by clicking on the link below

World of Jazz – 4th August 2011

This show looks at the work of Stuart McCallam – Manchester guitarist and member of the Cinematic Orchestra – and touches on the vibraphone in jazz, and the great drummer Art Taylor :

  • Donald Byrd – When Your Love Has Gone – Off to the Races :   Donald Byrd – one of the finest hard bop trumpeters of the post-Clifford Brown era – recorded prolifically as both a leader and sideman from the mid-’50s into the mid-’60s, mostly for the Blue Note lable, where he established himself  as a solid stylist with a clean tone, and a good melodic ear. This 1958 album proved to be one of his best sessions and with a brilliant supporting band of  — Jackie McLean (alto sax), Wynton Kelly (piano), Pepper Adams(baritone sax), Sam Jones (bass), Art Taylor (drums) — Byrd turns in one of his strongest recordings of the era.
  • Stuart McCallam – Lament for Levenshulme – Distilled : Manchester guitarist and composer Stuart McCallum is best known for his work with Cinematic Orchestra. The distinctive, ethereal and atmospheric sound of his guitar has been at the heart of their sound since 2004, including on the albums ‘Ma Fleur’ and ‘Live At The Royal Albert Hall’ and the award winning soundtrack ‘The Crimson Wing’. His own music influenced by jazz and DJ Culture is a distillation of many influences, creating a sound that is concentrated and distinctive. McCallum who admits to influences from Wes Montgomery to Bjork, Flying Lotus to Bon Iver and James Blake to Bill Frisell, as well as modern art, eschews over complicated harmonic and rhythmical structures in favour of a rich mix of electronica and improvisation enriched by elegant orchestral writing. Distilled, McCallum’s brilliant third album, and first for new label Naim, is a culmination of the music he has written over the last few year and the idea of ‘distillation’ is right at the heart of how the record was written. McCallum ‘sampled’ the best bits of his compositions, using them as the basis for further writing, before again sampling the results, and so on, until arriving at the perfectly distilled version of what he wanted to say. The result is a sublime slice of ambient-jazz-electonica with beautiful melodies and gorgeous soundscapes. But it isn’t just the process, McCallum’s own music is ‘distilled’: simple, memorable and melodic, minimalist and repetitive like modern dance music. His music owes as much to dance music as it does jazz. McCallum’s music thrives in the spaces between genres and on Distilled the improvisation is part of the compositional process. But it’s his use of technology that helps give the music its unique sound, be it looped instruments, samples, or his ethereal guitar McCallum utilises technology to create unique soundscapes, that are in equal part performance, composition and improvisation. It will be released on October 3rd.
  • Cinematic Orchestra – As the stars fall – Ma Fleur : led by composer/programmer/multi-instrumentalist Jason Swinscoe, this band merges modern urban dance, with jazz and cinematic music with great effect -this, the first album to feature Stuart McCallam, comprises a series of moody, evocative pieces.
  • Cal Tjader – Hip Vibrations – Hip Vibrations :  Cal Tjader recorded frequently for Verve during the 1960s, and this is one of his more unusual sessions. Instead of fronting his regular Latin group he plays arrangements by Benny Golson or Bobby Bryant, accompanied a band that includes Ernie Royal, Marvin Stamm, J.J. Johnson, Jerome Richardson, Mel Lewis, with either Ron Carter or Richard Davis on bass, and three different pianists: Herbie Hancock, Patti Bown, or John Bunch.
  • Bobby Hutcherson – Maiden Voyage -Happenings : Bobby Hutcherson’s first quartet album features the vibraphonist’s soloing abilities, matching him  with pianist Herbie Hancock, drummer Joe Chambers, and bassist Bob Cranshaw. An interesting reading of Hancock’s tune is the centre-piece to a fine album.
  • Art Taylor – Cookoo and Fungi – AT’s Delight : Although Taylor was one of the busiest modern second-generation jazz drummers, working in the studio with Coleman Hawkins, Donald Byrd, John Coltrane and many others, he only released five albums under his own name, of which this was the third. Conga player Carlos “Patato” Valdes joins Taylor and pianist Wynton Kelly and bassist Paul Chambers on three cuts including this calypso.  The horn men  are Stanley Turrentine on tenor sax and Dave Burns on trumpet.
  • Stuart McCallam – Distilled – Distilled : the album features McCallum on guitars and sampler alongside bassists Ira Coleman and Robin Mullarkey, harpist Rachel Gladwin (best known in the jazz world for her work with Matthew Halsall), drummer Dave Walsh, legendary Manchester based percussionist Chris Manis and Iain Dixon on woodwinds.
  • The Cinematic Orchestra – Transformation – Les Ailes Pourpres : from the songtrack to a Disney film about Flamingoes.
  • John Coltrane with the Red Garland Trio – Soft Lights and Sweet Music : For his second album, John Coltrane (tenor saxophone) joined forces with his Prestige labelmate Red Garland (piano)  supported by a rhythm section of Paul Chambers (bass) and Art Taylor (drums) with this exquisite version of an Irving Berlin classic.
  • Dexter Gordon – Shiny Stockings – Gettin’ Around : Dexter spent the  mid-’60s period living in Europe coming back to the U.S. for the occasional recording session. His teaming with Bobby Hutcherson on this session was interesting in that at that time  the vibraphonist was already marking his territory as a maverick and challenging improviser – so how would this sit with Gordon’s traditional approach? Fear not –  the two principals prove compatible- they have a shared vision on what to deliver. Add the brilliant Barry Harris to this mix, plus Bob Cranshaw and Billy Higgins and you have a bit of a classic.
Click on the link to hear the show…..