World of Jazz – 1st November 2012

The last show to be broadcast on Salford City Radio – the show will continue in podcast form on Mixcloud from next week…..

As a bit of a celebration a selection of my favourite jazz artists:

  • John Coltrane – Alabama – Live At Birdland
  • Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers – Dat Dere – The Complete Blue Note Recordings
  • Lee Morgan – Stormy Weather – Sonic Boom
  • Miles Davis – Shhh/Peaceful – In A Silent Way
  • Duke Ellington – Perdido –  Masterpieces 1926-1949
  • Roland Kirk – The Black & Crazy Blues – The Inflated Tear
  • Chet Baker – The Night We Called It A Day – Embraceable You
  • John Coltrane – Like Someone In Love – Lush Life

Listen here………

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World of Jazz – 29th September 2011

On this show….

  • Skalpel – Break In (Backini Remix) – 1958 Breaks
  • Nils Petter Molvaer – Sleep With Echoes – Baboon Moon
  • Stian Westerhus – Empty Hands Mirrored Softly – Pitch Black Star Spangled
  • Charlie Parker – Loverman – The Complete Verve Master Takes
  • Fabiano Orchestra – West Indian Meditation – Butterfly Island
  • Mathias Eick – Biemann – Skala
  • Sonny Stitt – Confirmation – Stitt Plays Bird
  • Stanley Turrentine – The Hustler – Hustlin’
  • Rahsaan Roland Kirk – Funk Underneath – Kirk’s Work
  • Nils Petter Molvaer – Prince of Calm – Baboon Moon
  • Van Morrison – Bright Side of the Road – Into the Music
  • Richie Barron – No Trouble Tonight – Rather Have The Green Than The Blues
To listen to the show click on the link

World of Jazz – 7th April 2011 – Saxophone

Especially for my good friends Tricia and Tony….

  1. Jimmy Heath – The Voice of the Saxophone – The Time and the Place – a fine solo from “Little Bird” from his 1974 album – the album also features trombonist Curtis Fuller, guitarist Pat Martino, pianist Stanley Cowell, bassist Sam Jones, drummer Billy Higgins and percussionist Mtume.
  2. Roland Kirk – The Things I Love – The Complete Works of Roland Kirk – confusing this one as there are two Kirk albums with the same title but this is the Mercury release from 1964 with Horace Parlan, Michael Fleming and Steve Ellington and not the live album from Ronnie Scott’s. It’s included in the huge box set of Kirk Mercury recordings.
  3. Charlie Parker – Hot House – Burnin’ Bird – This Savoy compilation features various recordings made by Bird during the mid- to late- ’40s. Most bebop fanatics will have these tracks on other discs, but if you want a primer for one of (if not the) pre-eminent alto players in jazz you should find this album a good starting point.
  4. Joe Henderson – Summertime – Porgy and Bess –  Joe Henderson’s take on Porgy and Bess meets his usual high standards and it would be his last studio album before his death in 2001. The band is fantastic  including guitarist John Scofield, pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Dave Holland, drummer Jack DeJohnette, trombonist Conrad Herwig and vibraphonist Stefon Harris– this samba take on the Gershwin’s “Summertime” is great fun.
  5. James Spaulding – Little Willie Leaps – Brilliant Corners -On what was surprisingly only his third recording as a leader, Spaulding is heard at the peak of his powers, leading a quartet/quintet also including pianist Mulgrew Miller, bassist Ron Carter, drummer Kenny Washington, and (on half of the selections) trumpeter Wallace Roney. His version of Miles’ “Little Willie Leaps” is a high point on what is probably his best album.
  6. David Binney – Traveller – South – one example of the more recent batch of great alto players Binney is a great writer and player, this album proves to be a great listen both musical clever but also full of great passion.
  7. Hank Mobley – When I Fall In Love – The Jazz Message of Hank Mobley Volume 1 – One of Hank’s earlier album’s in which he trades solos with the great Donald Byrd. Uniquely on Storyville given most of  Hank’s releases were confined to Blue Note from 1957 onwards.
  8. John Coltrane – Everytime I Say Goodbye – My Favorite Things – Trane on soprano for a stellar reading of Cole Porter’s famous tune. His soprano playing on this track has been described as definitive – few would argue.
  9. David Sanborn – First Song – Another Hand – this 1991 album was David’s first for Elektra and a definite career move away from r n b to a more considered jazz style. This reading of Charlie Haden’s tune features the composer, the master of the guitar Bill Frisell and the ever talented Joey Baron on drums.
  10. Johnny Hodges – Mood Indigo – Four Classic Albums – Owner of the most beautiful tone ever heard in jazz, altoist  Hodges formed his style early on and had little reason to change it through the decades. Although he could do the fast stuff and blow plenty of blue notes, his luscious playing on ballads has never been topped. This 1952 reading of the Ellington classic seemed a perfect way to end the show.

To listen to the show follow the link below

World of Jazz – 6th January 2010

The usual mix of jazz from around the world including:

The Jadid Ensemble – a “world music” band from Manchester who manage to meld flamenco with Turkish and Arabic music with a smidgen of jazz to create a relaxed and compelling sound.

Paulo Fresu – a handful of tunes featuring Paulo’s work with Ralph Towner, Carla Bley and Enrico Rava.  This italian trumpeter builds on Miles Davis’s sound from the 1950s and he has been extremely productive with over 130 albums in his discography.

Ahmad Jamal – a great player who did not achieve much commercial recognition – an innovator and minimalist who Miles Davis (him again!) counted as one his main influencers.

Horace Tapscott  – another great writer who did not make it onto the main jazz stage – highly regarded by his peers.

Johnny Dyani – a great bass player and composer whose music combines  South African folk heritage with Ornette Coleman’s free bop and elements of avant-garde jazz.

Don Grolnick – a subtle and rather underrated pianist throughout his career, but his flexibility and talents were well known to his fellow musicians.

Roland Kirk – some might argue he is the most exciting saxophone soloist in jazz history,  a post-modernist before that phrase even existed. A master at  mixing and matching elements from jazz  history, with memorable results.